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Greenbarn Potter's Supply Ltd.

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Storefront is currently closed, as of Nov30. See our COVID statement.

Mo-Fr 8:30-5PM, closed Sat, Sun and long weekends.

Next closure for stat holiday is for Victoria Day, closed on Monday, May 24th

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Western Canada's largest distributor of pottery materials and supplies. Clays, raw materials, tools, wheels, kilns, slabrollers, books & much more.

Our continuing goal is to supply artists, potters and crafts people with great quality products, knowledge and customer service. Our staff is familiar with all the items we stock and can help you through the selection and ordering process. We will also see that your order is shipped according to your directions, or put together for pick up at our retail store in Surrey, BC.

COVID-19 Alert

Shipping and Curb-side pick up only

Starting on Dec 1, 2020, this measure is in response to the increase in COVID cases, and is for the safety of our customers and employees. Due to the increasing travel restrictions, and COVID variants, we are monitoring Dr. Henry's broadcasts in order to do our part where possible for our community. We are accepting orders via phone 604-888-3411, and at 'sales@greenbarn.com'

Help us keep supplies moving smoothly by following these ordering hints:

    1. Please allow 2 hours for us to assemble your orders for pick up

    2. We kindly request that you consider your order carefully before placing it, so as to avoid making additions. Each addition will add several steps for us, and slows down order assembly

    3. If you need to make an addition to your order, we may place you further back in the line, depending upon how busy we are at the time. At worst, this may require treating this as a separate order, so please allow up to 2 hours for us to process any additions

Big thanks to all of our friends, suppliers, and customers!

Hi Everyone,

Thank you so much for your wonderful support. We truly appreciate your patience and patronage, and we all feel so lucky to serve such a wonderful community.

Because COVID case numbers gave us a scare by rising sharply throughout winter in BC, we have seen some increased restrictions. With increasingly contagious variants of COVID popping up, Dr. Henry is advising continued caution in our community as we monitor this new risk. Despite these concerns, there is so much to be proud of our in our continued efforts.

By working together, and by doing little things to keep each other safe, we are speeding up our province's return to normal. I know that it's difficult, that we miss the convenience of our old lives, and that we are all feeling tired of Covid notices, masks, and sanitizer. While we may not have it as bad as our neighbours, we have all still experienced losses in our lives.

Greenbarn's curbside pick-up program is designed to limit personal contact while still allowing us to answer questions, and to safely provide clay materials to our customers. We understand the frustration and inconvenience which is caused by our storefront being closed, but we sincerely appreciate your patience and your willingness to help us to do our part.

With each of us doing that little bit of extra prevention wherever we can, we'll not only halt the rise of cases, and keep the vulnerable safe, but we'll also bend the curve back down. With vaccinations on the horizon, we just need to maintain this trend and work toward enjoying our reward of a 'looser' Spring and Summer!

So, Thank you for doing your part. And, thank you so much for helping us to do our part.

Thank you, and wishing you well, From all of us at Greenbarn.

Technical Tips Blog

Crawling in G2934Y zircon white glaze: There are simple fixes

A matte glazed G2934Y mug where the glaze has crawled on the upper handle join

G2934Y is a fabulous base glaze but it is not without issues. It has significant clay content in the recipe and high levels of Al2O3 in the chemistry, these make it susceptible to crawling. While it is normally fine as is, when you add certain stains to color it (especially at significant percentages) or opacify it using zircon (this has 10%), it can become more susceptible to crawling. On this mug, the glaze layer thickens at the recess of the handle join, that produces crawling during firing. Crawling can also happen on the insides of mugs, where wall and foot meet at a sharp angle. This happens, both because the glaze cracked here during drying and because the zircon stiffens the melt, making it less mobile. Rounding such contours will help. Even better, adjust the glaze recipe so it shrinks a little less on drying (by trading 5% of the raw kaolin for calcined). Adding a little CMC gum (e.g. 0.1-0.2%) will make it adhere better.

Context: G2934Y, CMC Gum, G2934Y variations for fired hardness, COE adjustment, less crawling, etc

Saturday 20th March 2021

Blisters in a highly melt-fluid cone 6 sculpture glaze

A copper sculpture glaze is blistering

Why are these happening (on this piece by Paul Briggs)? It is not completely clear. The glaze has plenty of carbonates, including copper, enough for over 20% LOI. But these normally produce high populations of small blisters, this is the opposite. The melt appears to have enough surface tension that the bubbles survive and endure top-temperature-soaking. And they don't pop until the temperature has dropped so far that insufficient melt-mobility remains to heal them. The glaze has an unconventionally low SiO2 content, that makes it flow vigorously, well enough that the melt is moving and collecting in surface contours. The glaze recipe is quite unconventional, any effort to "improve" its adherence to limits would likely lose the visual aesthetic. A drop-and-hold firing schedule is likely the key to alleviating this.

Context: Blisters, Melt Fluidity, Cone 6 Drop-and-Soak Firing Schedule

Friday 19th March 2021

Cone 6 oil-spot glaze effect, what works and does not work?

Cone 6 glazed tiles of white-on-black oil spot glazes

Simulating a white-on-black oil-spot effect at cone 6 oxidation proved to be a matter of repeated testing (that got me past some misconceptions). Stopping to think about the results at each step and keeping a good audit trail with pictures, in my account at insight-live.com, really helped. I had three black glazes: G2934BL satin (G2934 with black stain), G2926BB super-gloss (G2926B with black stain) and G3914A Alberta Slip black. Going on a hunch, I mixed up a bucket of the G3914A first (with some gum to help it survive second-coating without lifting). Rather than just try any white, I created G3912A by substituting as much CaO and MgO as possible for SrO in the G2934Y base. I later learned this to be an error, SrO reduces the surface tension, I should have used MgO (the G2934Y is a high-MgO glaze so it would have been fine as-is)! As you can see on the far right, this white still worked (at cone 5, 6, 7, 8). Why? There is another factor even more important. The effect only works on the Alberta Slip black. But its LOI is not higher than the others. And it worked even after ball milling. So I need to continue to work on this to learn more about why this works.

Context: Creating a Cone 6 Oil-Spot Overglaze Effect, Oil-spot glaze

Friday 19th March 2021

Casting plates, is it practical?

A leather hard plate cracked in the plastic mold

No. Because you will face a whole array of problems. This is the first, poor mold release, or more correct, impossible mold release! Plates will be too thin walled. If you cast them longer wall thickness will be uneven. Edges will crack like this (because of poor plasticity). They will warp during drying. They will lack dry strength for handling. They will warp during firing. You won't be able to get a good rim. You won't be able to cast a foot ring without an indent showing on the inside. Note here that another issue is at play: The clay is either not plastic enough to cut cleanly at the rim, without tearing. Or, it is being cut too late or with a dull knife. These tears provide places for cracks to initiate. Plates are much better made using the jiggering, ram pressing or dust pressing processes. Or by throwing them on plaster batts.

Context: Jiggering, Casting-Jiggering, Slip Casting

Tuesday 16th March 2021

Drip glazing and bare outsides: Deceptively difficult.

thick glaze drips on ceramic vessels

Why? Glaze fit. These are available on Aliexpress (as Drip Pottery) and they are made by a manufacturer that has close control of body maturity (and thus strength) and a dilatometer to precisely match the thermal expansion of the glaze. The glaze has to fit better than normal because of the absence of an outside glaze. Too low an expansion and it's compression (outward pressure) will fracture body (because these are thin-walled pieces). Too high and it will craze. And that thick glaze? It will shiver or craze with far less forgiveness than a thin layer. And how did they get the glaze on this thick? They deflocculated it, up to 1.7 or more, glazed the inside, let it dry, then glazed the outside. These pieces are a visual and technical achievement. If you are a potter you had best think twice before attempting the same.

Context: Glaze at 1.7 specific gravity on green-ware. Way too thick!, Why are these vessels cracking when hot water is poured in?, Deflocculation, Glaze fit, Glaze Compression, Glaze thickness

Monday 15th March 2021

How to make an incredibly white engobe for terra cotta

Two terra cotta slip-cast vessels with white inner surface

I found seven secrets with recipe, process, glaze and firing. 1. A lot of Zircopax, in this case 20% (for whiteness, opacity). 2. The whitest burning materials: New Zealand Halloysite as the kaolin and nepheline syenite as the feldspar. 3. 3% Veegum to gel the slurry (enabling low specific gravity for thin and even coating). 4. The recipe, L3685Z2, has 55% kaolin, that will certainly produce drying cracks. But 1% CMC gum stops that and makes it brushable. It even works on on bisque, I pour-applied it to the insides of these two slip-cast pieces, it drained to perfectly even coverage (in a very thin layer). 5. A terra cotta casting/throwing body to fit the engobe to (has the same fired shrinkage at a target temperature, e.g. cone 04): Initially I am using L4170B. 6. A clear glaze that fits and is transparent: Notice how much whiter the left one is, G3879. At the same thickness as the G1916Q on the right, it is more transparent, better transmitting the white of the engobe. 7. The right firing curve: The 04DSDH drop-and-hold schedule for defect free surfaces.

Context: Fitting an engobe: It is about the data!, Terra cotta casting slip, engobe and glaze recipes for cone 04

Thursday 11th March 2021

How could only a 5% fine grog body be suitable for such large pieces?

Louise Solecki Weir working on one of her large sculptures. Sculptors can be passionate about the clay they use. For good reason, they have a lot to lose. While it might seem that Louise would be most concerned about drying shrinkage and drying performance (resistance to drying cracks), not so. To her, the ability to re-wet sections that dry out is paramount. And she has learned to overcome drying challenges posed by the high plasticity to benefit from the smooth texture, workability and rewetability it offers. How plastic is this clay (Plainsman F96)? It is a five-equal-parts-mix of silica sand/grog, ball clay, Lincoln fireclay, a low fire red clay and a medium fire red clay (there is no feldspar or silica). All four of the clays are highly plastic to super plastic. The body's drying shrinkage would be 8% if it was not for the 20% aggregate (a mix of fine 75 mesh sand with a small complement of fine 40 mesh grog) that reduce it to 6.5%. These offer a far higher surface area than coarse grog and provide channels for water to re-enter. If you would like the recipe of this body (non-production) please contact us.

Context: F-75 Silica Sand, Plasticity, Grog

Saturday 6th March 2021

Wanna throw porcelain plates with thick bottoms and thin rims?

Then they may need a week to dry! This plate had a one-inch-thick base (while the rim is a quarter of that). During the first few hours a thin rim like this will dry quickly, leaving the base far behind. But as soon as it would support the weight of a cover-cloth I put it into a garbage bag and sealed and left it for several days. Even after that it did not detach easily from the plaster, even though the bat had been dry. When I did get it off the base was still quite soft but the rim was stiff enough to enable turning it over and trimming it (I endeavoured to create a cross section of even thickness). Then I dried it under layers of cloth for several more days. It took at least a week. Had I allowed the rim to dry out during the first few hours it would likely have cracked later on.

Context: Drying Ceramics Without Cracks, Why throw on a plaster bat when making larger pieces?, Drying Performance, Clay Cracking During Drying

Wednesday 24th February 2021

G2926B transparent glaze, proven reliable and durable

A hand made pottery mug that rivals the quality of industrial ware

While colorful glazes on the outsides of pieces get lots of praise and glory, the transparent or white providing the functional surface on the insides of pieces often gets little attention. Really, what good is an attractive piece if the food surface is crazed, pinholed, blistered, leached, cutlery marked. This liner glaze, G2926B, is special at cone 6. It is a good example of how I found a recipe, recognized its potential and tuned and adjusted it to be better. It has proven itself as a base to host all manner of colorants, opacifiers and variegators. One of the reasons it is so widely used is that it has a story, it is well documented, with a code number that Google indexes. Drinking from a mug having a quality functional surface instills pride as its maker. And it minimizes complaints from customers.

Context: The Development of G2926B Cone 6 Clear Glaze

Monday 22nd February 2021

Milk as a glaze! How is that possible?

Clay tiles, one unglazed, one carbon glazed

After watching a youtube video (link below) about a Karelian potter, who uses this technique to make cookware, I could not wait to try it. He unloads the ware from his kiln (which appears to be a standard electric top loader used by potters in the west), and while still hot he immerses pieces in a bucket of milk for a few seconds. When he withdraws them they are steaming. I mixed some 2% milk and cream (to get closer to the whole milk he was using) and cold-dipped an 1850F bisque-fired jar and tile (of Plainsman L210) for about a minute (to enable it to soak in as much as possible). The potter claims to fire his ware to 300-350 degrees. I fired 500F/hr to 612F (350C), then held for 10 minutes and shut off to free fall. And it worked beautifully, high enough to get lots of carbon (which is only on the surface), not high enough to burn it away. The surface is smooth and pleasant-to-touch, it is odor-free. The potter claims it retains this surface over many years despite repeated oven use. This clay body, L210, is well suited since it is very fine-grained and fires to such a smooth unglazed surface. And the carbon makes it much better. Indigenous cultures throughout history have learned how to prepare, cook and store food in terra cotta clays like this, they withstand thermal shock better than vitrified stonewares and porcelains. Of course, more testing is needed, I will report as I proceed.

Context: Karelian potter produces glossy black pottery using milk as a glaze, Casein on Wikipedia, PolyWhey coatings by Vermont Natural Coatings, Terra cotta

Saturday 20th February 2021

Greenbarn Potter's Supply Ltd., 9548 - 192nd Street, SURREY, BC V4N 3R9
Phone: 604-888-3411, FAX: 604-888-4247, Email: sales@greenbarn.com